Research Articles

Shoulder and Hand Syndrome Relief with Acupuncture

Posted on Jun 12, 2012 in Health and Wellness, Research Articles

Acupuncture treatment good for shoulder-hand syndrome Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22574575 Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy for shoulder-hand syndrome. METHODS: According to the requirements of evidence-based medicine, papers of randomized controlled clinical trials for shoulder-hand syndrome published in China from 2005 to 2010 collected by databases VIP, Wanfang, CNKI, collections of papers of academic conferences, etc. were retrieved by using key words of shoulder-hand syndrome, reflex sympathetic dystrophy, acupuncture, moxibustion. Then the collected documents were given with Jadad score, and analyed by using software Manager 5. 0 Review Cochrane. RESULTS: A total of 100 papers were retrieved. Among them, 29 papers that met our inclusion criteria were given with Jadad scores (2 points for 2 papers, 1 point for the rest 27 papers, being low in quality). Twenty-one papers were brought into Meta analysis. These papers contain 1 768 cases of patients who were divided into three sets of groups according to the used intervention measures. Meta-analysis showed that simple acupuncture therapy is significantly superior to acupoint block therapy for relieving shoulder-hand syndrome [odds ratio (OR, 95% CI) 4.80 (2.02 to 11.41), P < 0.05]; electroacupuncture therapy is markedly more effective than simple acupuncture therapy [OR (95% CI) 4.60 (2.08 to 10. 17), P < 0.05]; and acu-moxibustion combined with other therapies is significantly more effective than simple acupuncture therapy [OR (95% CI) 3.31 (2. 30 to 4.77), P < 0.05]. The other 8 papers were not brought into Meta-analysis due to being different to the 21 papers in the intervention measures. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture can effectively relieve shoulder-hand syndrome in pain, wrist- and shoulder-joint motor, etc. But, larger size of samples and high quality randomized clinical trials are needed for providing more reliable conclusive evidence.     Goldlake Acupuncture...

Read More

Acupuncture improves Osteoarthritis of the Knee

Posted on Jun 12, 2012 in Acupuncture, Research Articles

Acupuncture good for osteoarthritis of the knee Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22588814 A new study showed that Acupuncture is effective at both reducing inflammation and restoring mobility of arthritic knees. We can help get you moving better at Goldlake Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine in Scottsdale: 480-710-8458.  

Read More

Department of Defense to Study Acupuncture

Posted on Mar 24, 2012 in Acupuncture, Research Articles

$1.2 Million Grant from the U.S. Department of Defense to Study Acupuncture By: New England School of Acupuncture NEWTON, MA (June 23, 2010) – The New England School of Acupuncture (NESA) is the recipient of a $1.2 million U.S. Department of Defense grant to fund a first-of-its-kind clinical trial: the Effectiveness of Acupuncture in the Treatment of Gulf War Illness (GWI). In the first treatment trial ever performed to research the effectiveness of acupuncture on GWI, NESA’s researchers will study how acupuncture affects sufferers of this complex syndrome, which is characterized by many symptoms, including fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, headaches, dizziness, memory problems, indigestion, skin problems, shortness of breath, and mood disorders. More than 100,000 of the 700,000 Gulf War veterans report chronic multi-symptom illnesses which persist for years after seeking treatment. “Many veterans have received treatment directed towards their symptoms, but reports from five- and 10-year follow-ups show that symptoms remain, including some which are severe and disabling,” says Lisa Conboy MA, MS, ScD, Co-director of the Research Department and Chair of the Biomedical Department at NESA, and Principal Investigator for NESA’s upcoming clinical trial. Conboy continues, “Clearly, an effective treatment for these conditions could be of great benefit to those suffering from Gulf War Illness.” The trial’s participants will include 120 veterans from the Boston/New England area suffering from GWI. They will be treated by licensed acupuncturists, who have a master’s degree in acupuncture, and who have at least five years of clinical experience as well as extensive training in the diagnosis and treatment of the symptoms of GWI. Veterans will receive care directed specifically to their most distressing symptom. Although the specific etiology of GWI is unknown, previous research suggests that acupuncture is effective in the treatment of many of the symptoms of GWI. Acupuncture is already commonly used in the West and preliminary evidence from clinical research supports its use for many of the symptoms associated with this syndrome including fatigue and depression. Acupuncture has also demonstrated efficacy for a variety of painful musculoskeletal disorders, and as a treatment for both acute and chronic pain after amputation in military contexts. Further, there is evidence that acupuncture treatments may affect important mechanisms of healing such as stress mediation....

Read More

Acupuncture Fatigue Study treats Women with Breast Cancer

Posted on Feb 20, 2012 in Health and Wellness, Research Articles

Breakthrough Breast Cancer launches the world’s largest and most advanced clinical trial to investigate whether acupuncture may help women with breast cancer cope with fatigue, a major side effect of breast cancer treatment. The ACU.FATIGUE study is the first to be funded as part of Breakthrough’s programme of research to develop high quality, scientific studies looking at complementary therapies used by breast cancer patients Over 60% of breast cancer patients use complementary therapies to try to help ease the side effects of their treatment such as fatigue, nausea or hot flushes. However, little is currently known about how they may work or how safe they are for patients to use alongside conventional treatments like chemotherapy and radiotherapy Breakthrough’s ACU.FATIGUE study, led by Professor Alex Molassiotis, Professor of Cancer & Supportive Care at The University of Manchester, aims to recruit 320 women who have undergone chemotherapy within the last five years and have high levels of fatigue. Cancer-related fatigue is a feeling of persistent exhaustion or loss of strength whilst undergoing treatment. It is different from ‘normal’ fatigue experienced by healthy individuals in that it is not relieved by rest or sleep. The study will be the world’s largest clinical trial of acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in breast cancer patients and only the second of its kind worldwide. It will also be the first to examine the benefits of self-acupuncture for women with breast cancer. Jeremy Hughes, Chief Executive of Breakthrough Breast Cancer, says; “Many women use complementary therapies to try and help alleviate treatment side effects, increase their quality of life and reduce stress. However there is little information available for women to know whether or not something will work or whether it may interfere with their conventional treatment. There is a real need to understand more about the effectiveness and safety of complementary therapies such as acupuncture in cancer patients.” Eligible patients will be randomly selected to receive either weekly sessions of acupuncture for 6 weeks or standard care. After this period, patients in the acupuncture group will then be randomly selected to continue for a further 4 weeks to either receive weekly acupuncture by a therapist, undertake self acupuncture or receive no acupuncture. All patients’ fatigue levels will be monitored throughout this study, which will last for 3 years. The clinical trial will be conducted at the Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust in Manchester and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust in London. Professor Alex Molassiotis says; “Acupuncture is one of the more established complementary therapies and studies suggest that it is safe in the hands of a competent practitioner*. Other studies have shown that acupuncture may help ease nausea caused by chemotherapy and certain types of pain. Now we want to find out whether there is an added benefit of reducing levels of cancer-related fatigue, which can be debilitating and distressing and often mistaken for depression. “The results of this research could, improve the quality of life of breast cancer patients and add to the limited treatment choices for managing cancer related fatigue.” Shirley Rutter, aged 53 from Shropshire, used acupuncture during her treatment for breast cancer. She says; “I’ve explored a variety of complementary therapies including acupuncture and found them to be beneficial. I know people can be sceptical of complementary therapies, which is why research into this area is needed – patients need proof of whether these therapies work. Breakthrough’s study into whether acupuncture can help ease fatigue is an important step forward.” Working with Professor Molassiotis will be Professor Alison Richardson, Professor of Cancer and Palliative Nursing Care at the Florence Nightingale School...

Read More