Acupuncture

Beat the Summer Heat

Posted on Jun 18, 2012 in Acupuncture, Health and Wellness

Acupuncture and Chinese herbs can help keep you cool and collected during the long hot summer months. Acupuncture points like Hegu (LI 11 and 4) can reduce fever and body temperature.  Points such as Lu 7 and Ki6 nourish the body fluids, adjust and cool the lungs. Chinese Herbs such as Ju Hua (Chrysanthemum flowers), Jin Yin Hua (Honeysuckle flowers) and Lotus seeds all clear heat and nourish body fluids.  For more extreme cases of dryness, thirst, irritability, dry, red eyes or pink eye, insomnia there are many classical formulas to nourish yin and blood while reducing heat and fire such as Rehmannia Six or Eight and Glehnia Combination. Foods that help hydrate and reduce the heat in addition to increasing water intake are: mung bean sprouts, celery, carrot, water chesnut, bamboo shoots, lotus seed, goji berries, tofu and most fruits and vegetables.  Although beware of excessive fruit consumption which can imbalance your blood sugar and cause loose stools in persons with weak digestion. Visit us at Goldlake Acupuncture in Scottsdale for a session to chill out or an herbal formula to help your body cope with the heat better. 480-710-8458 New Patient June Special initial visit $25 off when you mention this post.  ...

Read More

Acupuncture improves Osteoarthritis of the Knee

Posted on Jun 12, 2012 in Acupuncture, Research Articles

Acupuncture good for osteoarthritis of the knee Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22588814 A new study showed that Acupuncture is effective at both reducing inflammation and restoring mobility of arthritic knees. We can help get you moving better at Goldlake Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine in Scottsdale: 480-710-8458.  

Read More

Study on Acupuncture aiding Weight Loss

Posted on Jun 12, 2012 in Acupuncture, Health and Wellness, Uncategorized

The effects of body acupuncture on obesity: anthropometric parameters, lipid profile, and inflammatory and immunologic markers Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22649299 Abstract A randomized controlled clinical trial in 196 obese subjects was performed to examine the effectiveness of body acupuncture on body weight loss, lipid profile and immunogenic and inflammatory markers. Subjects received authentic (cases) or sham (controls) acupuncture for 6 weeks in combination with a low-calorie diet. In the following 6 weeks, they received the low-calorie diet alone. Subjects were assessed at the beginning, 6 and 12 weeks later. Heat shock protein (Hsps)-27, 60, 65, 70 antibody titers and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels were also assessed. A significant reduction in measures of adiposity and improvement in lipid profile were observed in both groups, but the levels of anti-Hsp-antibodies decreased in cases only. A reduction in anthropometric and lipid profile in cases were sustained in the second period, however, only changes in lipid profile were observed in the control group. Anti-Hsp-antibodies and hs-CRP levels continued to be reduced in cases but in controls only the reduction in hs-CRP remained. Changes in anthropometric parameters, lipid profile, and anti-Hsp-antibodies were more evident in cases. Body acupuncture in combination with diet restriction was effective in enhancing weight loss and improving dyslipidemia.           Goldlake Acupuncture...

Read More

Department of Defense to Study Acupuncture

Posted on Mar 24, 2012 in Acupuncture, Research Articles

$1.2 Million Grant from the U.S. Department of Defense to Study Acupuncture By: New England School of Acupuncture NEWTON, MA (June 23, 2010) – The New England School of Acupuncture (NESA) is the recipient of a $1.2 million U.S. Department of Defense grant to fund a first-of-its-kind clinical trial: the Effectiveness of Acupuncture in the Treatment of Gulf War Illness (GWI). In the first treatment trial ever performed to research the effectiveness of acupuncture on GWI, NESA’s researchers will study how acupuncture affects sufferers of this complex syndrome, which is characterized by many symptoms, including fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, headaches, dizziness, memory problems, indigestion, skin problems, shortness of breath, and mood disorders. More than 100,000 of the 700,000 Gulf War veterans report chronic multi-symptom illnesses which persist for years after seeking treatment. “Many veterans have received treatment directed towards their symptoms, but reports from five- and 10-year follow-ups show that symptoms remain, including some which are severe and disabling,” says Lisa Conboy MA, MS, ScD, Co-director of the Research Department and Chair of the Biomedical Department at NESA, and Principal Investigator for NESA’s upcoming clinical trial. Conboy continues, “Clearly, an effective treatment for these conditions could be of great benefit to those suffering from Gulf War Illness.” The trial’s participants will include 120 veterans from the Boston/New England area suffering from GWI. They will be treated by licensed acupuncturists, who have a master’s degree in acupuncture, and who have at least five years of clinical experience as well as extensive training in the diagnosis and treatment of the symptoms of GWI. Veterans will receive care directed specifically to their most distressing symptom. Although the specific etiology of GWI is unknown, previous research suggests that acupuncture is effective in the treatment of many of the symptoms of GWI. Acupuncture is already commonly used in the West and preliminary evidence from clinical research supports its use for many of the symptoms associated with this syndrome including fatigue and depression. Acupuncture has also demonstrated efficacy for a variety of painful musculoskeletal disorders, and as a treatment for both acute and chronic pain after amputation in military contexts. Further, there is evidence that acupuncture treatments may affect important mechanisms of healing such as stress mediation....

Read More